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ISKCON Baroda
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ISKCON Baroda

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ISKCON Hare Krishna Land, Baroda, is a place where the ancient cult of Vaishnavism - worship of the Diety forms of Lord Krishna, specifically Sri Sri Radha Shyamsundar, Sri Sri Sri Jagannath, Baladev and Subhadradevi, and Sri Sri Gaur Nitai, is observed on a daily basis.

The "darshan mandap" - temple room - at Hare Krishna Land is tastefully decorated utilizing several forms of traditional Indian art.


Their Lordships are seated on exquisitely carved wooden "simhasanas", which were carved by a team of artists from Jaipur. These wooden simhasanas sit upon carved marble platforms. The entire ceiling in the Mandir is decorated with hand carved and "highlighted" (hand painted with "vegetable colors") Rajasthani designs, as are found in many thousands of palaces in Rajasthan. We have borrowed the design of the famous "Govindadeviji Mandir", inside the Maharaja's palace at Jaipur.

 

The exterior and interior of the Mandir are also decorated by hand carved pillars.

There is also a large simhasana upon which the statue of ISKCON Founder-Acharya Srila Prabhupada sits.

The 2,500 sq. ft. flooring is all high class marble for Abu Road in Rajasthan.

In the "ghummat", the round dome covering the darshan mandap, there is a grand "relief artwork", depecting Lord Krishna's "Ras-lila", as described in the "dashama skanda" (the tenth canto) of Srimad Bhagvatam, that was hand carved by artists from Krishnanagar, located near Sridham Mayapur in West Bengal.

Hundreds of pious "bhaktas" gather daily during the seven "aratis" - worship ceremonies - that take place are regular timings throughout the day. Additionally devotees are continuously entering the Mandir for darshan of Their Lordships whenever the Mandir remains open.

Last Updated ( Monday, 19 January 2009 17:30 )